Tuesday, 20 December 2016

How do we select potential nurses?

Roger Watson, Editor-in-Chief

In the UK recently a great deal of attention has been paid to the preparation of nurses, including the initial selection process. Interviewing - despite a complete lack of evidence - appears to be the backbone of UK government policy, and this study from the UK by Traynor et al (2016) studies the use of interviews in nursing student selection. The study titled: 'Identifying applicants suitable to a career in nursing: a value-based approach to undergraduate selection' is published in JAN and aimed to: 'complement existing evidence on the suitability of Multiple Mini Interviews as a potential tool for the selection of nursing candidates on to a BSc (Hons) nursing programme.'

Over 300 undergraduate nursing students took part with over 30 assessors and used the Multiple Mini Interview which is: 'modelled on the Objective Structured Clinical Examination and consists of several stations each with a different examiner.' The results were promising in that the method appeared to be reliable between assessors. However, there was no correlation with original interview scores or with academic performance. The authors conclude: 'We have shown that implementing an (Multiple Mini Interview) based on the assessment of  values is a feasible approach to selection in undergraduate nursing' but that there is a 'need for further improvement.'

You can listen to this as a podcast

Reference

TRAYNOR M., GALANOULI D., ROBERTS M., LEONARD L. & GALE T. (2016) Identifying applicants suitable to a career in nursing: a value-based approach to undergraduate selection. Journal of Advanced Nursing doi: 10.1111/jan.13227

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