Tuesday, 19 May 2015

Body-mind-spirit and depression

Roger Watson, Editor-in-Chief

A combined team from India and Hong Kong has investigated the use of a body-mind-spirit (BMS) intervention which 'highlights the components of Buddhism, recognition and acceptance of negative emotions, self-love techniques and gaining through pain' for people with depression.  The results are published by Rentala et al. (2105) in JAN in an article titled: 'Effectiveness of body–mind–spirit intervention on well-being, functional impairment and quality of life among depressive patients – a randomized controlled trial'.  

The aim of the project was: 'to examine the effectiveness of BMS intervention in improving outcomes (well-being, quality of life
and functional impairment) among the depressive patients.'  the BMS intervention was tested in a randomised controlled trial against treatment as usual (TAU).  The results showed that: 'Compared with the TAU group, the BMS group showed statistically significant decreases in depression and functional impairment'.

In the words of the authors: 'This is one of the few known studies on the subject which showed that BMS intervention implemented by a nurse was instrumental in bringing about significant changes among Indian depressive patients in terms of reduction in depressive and functional impairment scores, improvement in well-being and quality of life scores.'

You can also listen to this as a podcast.

Reference

Rentala S, Fong TCT, Nattala P, Chan CLW, Reddemma K (2015) Effectiveness of body–mind–spirit intervention on well-being, functional impairment and quality of life among depressive patients – a randomized controlled trial Journal of Advanced Nursing doi: 10.1111/jan.12677

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