Monday, 27 October 2014

Recovery from bulimia

Roger Watson, Editor-in-Chief

Most people know of someone with bulimia nervosa, but they probably know more people than they realise. This is often a hidden condition; when and if people recover, they may be unwilling to speak about it. The condition is more common in young women and the causes are not fully understood.

A recent study by Lindgren et al. (2014) titled: A qualitative study of young women’s experiences of recovery from Bulimia Nervosa and published in JAN interviewed women who had recovered from bulimia. The study aimed to: 'describe experiences of recovery from bulimia nervosa among young adult women'. The study size was small, but this could be considered a 'hard to reach' group; five women, between 23–26 years of age were interviewed about their recovery. The women described feeling stuck in bulimia nervosa, getting ready to change, breaking free of bulimia nervosa and grasping a new reality. In the words of the authors: 'feeling stuck in bulimia nervosa, getting ready to change, breaking free of bulimia nervosa and grasping a new reality'.


References

Lindgren B-M, Enmark A, Bohman A, Lundstrรถm M (2014) titled: A qualitative study of young women’s experiences of recovery from Bulimia Nervosa Journal of Advanced Nursing doi:10.1111/jan.12554


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