Tuesday, 27 May 2014

What influences adherence to immunosuppressive therapy following kidney transplant?

Roger Watson, Editor-in-Chief

A paper from a combined team in the Slovak Republic and The Netherlands and published in JAN titled 'Adherence in patients in the first year after kidney transplantation and its impact on graft loss and mortality: a cross-sectional and prospective study' describes a study involving 297 participants who had undergone renal transplantation where they provided a range of information about themselves post-transplant. The participants were evaluated for adherence to post-transplant immunosuppressive therapy and then the two sets of data analysed statistically to see what patient characteristics were related to adherence.

In the words of the authors (Prihodova et al. 2014): 'Female sex, higher education, higher perceived side effects of corticosteroids, better perceived cardiac and renal function and higher perceived family social support in the first year posttransplantation were associated with full adherence to immunosuppressive treatment.'  Alternatively, poor adherence  to immunosuppressive therapy led to a higher likelihood of death.

The consequences of this study are that, to help post renal transplantation patients adhere to their life-sustaining immunosuppressive therapy, renal transplant nurses and others involved with these patients can target information education and support at those least likely to adhere.




Reference

Prihodova L, Nagyova I, Rosenberger J, Majernikova M, Roland R, Groothoff JW,  van Dijk JP (2014) Adherence in patients in the first year after kidney transplantation and its impact on graft loss and mortality: a cross-sectional and prospective study Journal of Advanced Nursing doi:10.1111/jan.12447


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